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Summer Adoption Schedule

We have adoptions Saturday & Sunday at PetSmart at the following times. If you are interested in a specific pet, please fill out an application. Thank you!
Saturday (11am - 2pm) @ PetSmart, North Phoenix, 17035 N 7th Ave. in Phoenix. Go to Map
Sunday (11am - 2pm) @ PetSmart, Desert Ridge Marketplace, 21001 N. Tatum Blvd in Phoenix. Go to Map

  • Adopt

    If you are in need of a loving, furry family member, look no further. Help A Dog Smile has several dogs looking to transition from homeless dogs to happy dogs. Meet your match today! More

  • Donate

    We are an all-volunteer, 501(c)3 non profit organization. Every dollar you can spare helps save dogs' lives by funding vet care, food, and boarding. The dogs appreciate your support. More

  • About Us

    Help A Dog Smile officially incorporated in September 2012. We are a group of dedicated volunteers that have been working together for years to find forever homes for stray dogs. More

  • Partners

    Without our veterinary, boarding, and adoption partners, we could not do this life-saving work. Please support their businesses so we can keep rescuing dogs and finding homes. More

Pupdates Hot Off The Press: March 5, 2017

Recent Adoptions!!!

Livy

Jax

Marie

Montana

Mike

Muffin (Left)

Peanut

Piper



Featured Pet: Gunner

Meet Gunner!

Little GUNNER is a spunky guy who was found by a good samaritan  huddled in a corner of a shopping plaza in the hot Phoenix sun!  When no owner could be found, we welcomed him into our Rescue and provided him a safe, warm bed with lots of good food and other doggies and kitties to play with.  And he loves to play, play, play!  Although he was  a bit shy at first, he has learned to trust, warms up quickly and loves to give big kisses!  We  think he may have some Basenji in him as he is quite the yodeler and will gladly sing along with our volunteers! He also has the cutest curly tail.  GUNNER has been neutered, microchipped and vaccinated and he is crate and house trained to use a doggy door.   This little guy is about a year old and would love to find his forever home with someone who will treasure him for many, many years.  He would love daily walks, a yard to run in and another furry companion to play with in his forever home.

The adoption fee of $175 helps with medical expenses incurred by the Rescue.

If you want to meet him, please fill out an online application at helpadogsmile.org and we will contact you so that you can meet this handsome guy.



Education: Introducing your new dog to other dogs in the home

Introduce on neutral territory.

It’s best to let dogs become familiar with each other on neutral territory: outdoors. Each dog should be walked separately on a leash, and each walker should have a bag of high-value treats or food broken into small pieces. At first, walk the dogs at a distance where they can see each other but are not too provoked by each other’s presence. If the dogs are not showing any negative behaviors, reward them with treats just for seeing each other. For example, when the dog you’re walking looks at the other dog, you can say “Good boy!” in a happy, friendly voice and give him a treat. Repeat often.

Pay attention to each dog’s body language.

Watch carefully for body postures that indicate a defensive or wary response, including hair standing up on the dog’s back, teeth baring, growling, a stiff-legged gait or a prolonged stare. If you see such postures, either when the dogs are at a distance or near each other, immediately and calmly interrupt the interaction by interesting the dog in something else. If the dogs seem relaxed and comfortable, you can shorten the distance between them. Again, offer treats to the dogs any time they look at each other in a relaxed manner.

Let the dogs determine the pace of the introduction.

It’s possible that the dogs will just want to play with each other by the middle of the walk. It’s also possible that it will take more time before the dogs are comfortable enough to walk side by side. The most important thing is to take this introduction slowly. The more patient you are, the better your chance of success. Do not force the dogs to interact.

Once the dogs are able to view each other at a close proximity, allow one dog to walk behind the other, and then switch. If the dogs remain comfortable, allow them to walk side by side. Finally, let the dogs interact under close supervision. If one or both dogs show any signs of stress or agitation, proceed more slowly with the introduction.

Monitor closely in the home.

When first introducing the dogs in the home, use a sturdy, tall baby gate to separate them. Observe how they interact through the gate. Reinforce positive behavior by providing high-value treats to the dogs for positive interactions.

Make sure that there are no toys, food or treats left around the home that the dogs could potentially fight over. Also, be aware of situations that could lead to conflict—for example, when the dogs get overly excited. Closely monitor the dogs when they are together, rewarding them with treats, until you are 100% confident they are comfortable and safe with each other.

For help with introductions that don’t seem to be going well, contact a professional trainer or animal behaviorist.

http://www.humanesociety.org/animals/dogs/tips/introducing_new_dog.html?referrer=https://www.google.com/